Early Years Learning Framework

Children are connected with and contribute to their world

 Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation.

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Broaden their understanding of the world in which they live

 Children respond to diversity with respect

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Explore the diversity of culture, heritage, background and tradition and that diversity presents opportunities for choices and new understandings
  • Become aware of connections, similarities and differences between people
  • Listen to other’s ideas and respect different ways of being and doing
  • Practise inclusive ways of achieving coexistence

 Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Use play to investigate, project and explore new ideas
  • Demonstrate an increasing knowledge of, and respect for natural and constructed environments
  • Explore, infer, predict and hypothesise in order to develop an increased understanding of the interdependence between land, people, plants and animals
  • Show growing appreciation and care for natural and constructed environments
  • Develop an awareness of the impact of human activity on environments and the interdependence of living things

Children have a strong sense of well being

Children become strong in their social and emotional well being

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others

 Children are confident and involved learners

 Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Express wonder and interest in their environments
  • Are curious and enthusiastic participants in their learning
  • Use play to investigate, imagine and explore ideas
  • Follow and extend their own interests with enthusiasm, energy and concentration
  • Participate in a variety of rich and meaningful inquiry-based experiences
  • Persevere and experience the satisfaction of achievement
  • Persist even when they find a task difficult

 Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Engage in learning relationships
  • Use their senses to explore natural and built environments
  • Experience the benefits and pleasures of shared learning exploration
  • Express wonder and interest in their environments
  • Are curious and enthusiastic participants in their learning

 Children are effective communicators

 Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Engage in enjoyable interactions using verbal and non-verbal language
  • Respond verbally and non-verbally to what they see, hear, touch, feel and taste
  • Contribute their ideas and experiences in play, small and large group discussions
  • Interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, clarify and challenge thinking, negotiate and share new understandings

  Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • View and listen to printed, visual and multimedia texts and respond with relevant gestures, actions, comments and/or questions

 Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • Use language and engage in play to imagine and create roles, scripts and ideas
  • Use the creative arts such as drawing, painting, sculpture, drama, dance, movement, music and storytelling to express ideas and make meaning